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Scientific studies

Scientific studies

The effect of the wearing of weighted vests on the sensory behaviour of learners diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder within a school context

Fransli Buckle B OT, M OT Occupational Therapist at School of Achievement Denise Franzsen B SC (OT), M Sc(OT), DHT Lecturer, Department Occupational...

Fransli Buckle B OT, M OT
Occupational Therapist at School of Achievement

Denise Franzsen B SC (OT), M Sc(OT), DHT
Lecturer, Department Occupational Therapy, School of Therapeutic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Witwatersrand

Juanita Bester B OT, BSc Hons Med Sciences, M Phil Higher Education, Post Grad Dip Monitoring and Evaluation
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, Division Occupational Therapy, University of Stellenbosch

Abstract

Purpose: Children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often have sensory processing difficulties. Therefore, they find it difficult to function optimally in the classroom environment. This study investigated the effect that wearing a weighted vest had on their in-seat behaviour, task completion speed and attention-to-task.

Method: A longitudinal experimental research design was employed with 30 foundation Phase learners from the School of Achievement; cross-over of treatment was implemented. Data on in-seat behaviour was measured by recording the period of time participants were able to stay seated. Task completion speed was assessed by timing how long participants were able to stay seated during literacy periods. The Conners’ Continues Performance Test II was used to measure participants’ attention to the task.

Results: The Phase group effect for in-seat behaviour and attention-to-task indicated a statistically significant difference when learners wore weighted vests. This was not true for task completion speed.

Conclusion: The weighted vests improved the in-seat behaviour and attention to task of learners diagnosed with ADHD in a classroom context.

» Full report in PDF-format

Pilot study of a sensory room in an acute inpatient psychiatric unit

Pilot study by following researchers: Theresa Novak Senior Occupational Therapist, Missenden Psychiatric Unit, Sydney and South Western Sydney Local Health Districts, Sydney, NSW,...

Pilot study by following researchers:

Theresa Novak
Senior Occupational Therapist, Missenden Psychiatric Unit, Sydney and South Western Sydney Local Health
Districts, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Justin Scanlan
Professional Senior – Occupational Therapy, Mental Health Services, Sydney and South Western Sydney Local
Health Districts, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Damien McCaul
Formerly Clinical Nurse Consultant, Mental Health Services, Sydney and South Western Sydney Local Health
Districts, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Nathan MacDonald
Nursing Unit Manager, Mental Health Services, Sydney and South Western Sydney Local Health Districts,
Sydney, NSW, Australia

Timothy Clarke
Registered Nurse, Missenden Psychiatric Unit, Sydney and South Western Sydney Local Health Districts,
Sydney, NSW, Australia

Abstract

Objective:
The use of sensory rooms (also known as comfort rooms) to reduce seclusion rates has generated a great deal of interest. This study examined the outcomes associated with the introduction of a sensory room in an acute inpatient psychiatric unit.

Method:
Consumers rated distress and staff rated a variety of disturbed behaviours before and after each use of the
room. Items used during each episode were recorded.

Results:
Use of the room was associated with significant reductions in distress and improvements in a range of disturbed behaviours. Those individuals who used the weighted blanket reported significantly greater reductions in distress and clinician-rated anxiety than those who did not. No changes were noted in rates of seclusion or aggression.

Conclusions:
The sensory room was an effective intervention to ameliorate distress and disturbed behaviour, although this did not translate into reductions in overall rates of seclusion or aggression. Weighted blankets appear to be particularly useful

 

Pilot study of a sensory room in an acute inpatient psychiatric unit

Effects of Weighted Vests on Attention, Impulse Control, and On-Task Behavior in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Hung-Yu Lin, Posen Lee, Wen-Dien Chang, Fu-Yuan Hong OBJECTIVE. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of using weighted vests for improving attention,...

Hung-Yu Lin, Posen Lee, Wen-Dien Chang, Fu-Yuan Hong

OBJECTIVE.
In this study, we examined the effectiveness of using weighted vests for improving attention, impulse control, and on-task behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHOD.
In a randomized, two-period crossover design, 110 children with ADHD were measured using the Conners’ Continuous Performance Test–II (CPT–II) task.
RESULTS.
In the weighted vest condition, the participants did show significant improvement in all three attentional variables of the CPT–II task, including inattention; speed of processing and responding; consistency of executive management; and three of four on-task behaviors, including off task, out of seat, and fidgets. No significant improvements in impulse control and automatic vocalizations were found.

CONCLUSION.
Although wearing a weighted vest is not a cure-all strategy, our findings support the use of the weighted vest to remedy attentional and on-task behavioral problems of children with ADHD.

Effects of Weighted Vests on Attention

A Review of Research on the Use of Weighted Vests with Children on the Autism Spectrum

Publication information: Article title: A Review of Research on the Use of Weighted Vests with Children on the Autism Spectrum. Contributors: Morrison, Erin...

Publication information:

Article title: A Review of Research on the Use of Weighted Vests with Children on the Autism Spectrum.
Contributors: Morrison, Erin E. – Author.
Journal title: Education. Volume: 127. Issue: 3
Publication date: Spring 2007. Page number: 323+. © 1999

Project Innovation.

A Review of Research on the Use of Weighted Vests with Children on the Autism Spectrum

Pilot study

Somna conducted a pilot study to investigate the effects of Kedjetäcket concerning the quality of sleep.

Somna conducted a pilot study to investigate the effects of The Blanket concerning the quality of sleep. The study was directed by a group of sleeping experts at the SDS clinic in Gothenburg. All participants described The Blanket as pleasant and appreciated the feeling of being embraced like in a “cocoon”. Four of five experienced that it was easier to fall asleep. All participants increased their total amount of sleep as well as an enhanced sleep efficiency in three of four cases.

Report on the usage of weight blankets in the county council of Västmanland

Report on the follow-up of usage on weight blankets in the county council of Västmanland. The following quotes are a selection of the...

Report on the follow-up of usage on weight blankets in the county council of Västmanland. The following quotes are a selection of the report;

“ Effect during sleep- 82 % has experienced an increased bodily relaxation during the night. 73 % experienced that they needed less time to fall asleep. 72 % have experienced an increased time of uninterrupted sleep. 63 % experienced a decreased amount of worry and anxiety. This is consistent in all groups with a small variation.”

“Effect daytime – an improved night-sleep has also given positive effects daytime. Almost 50 % of all users have felt more rested, experienced less worry, anxiety and restlessness. The blankets has also shown positive effect on mood and concentration.